Yellow, Lost

Poetry / Robert Okaji

The forgotten poem, existing in title only: Yellow.

Which is a bruise at three weeks, or memory’s shade in autumn.

In what black folder does it hide? In which blinding light?

I take comfort in primaries, lose sleep at the edges.

Where fraying begins and annotation dwindles to scrawled lines.

Above the bones and flesh of the Egyptian gods. Above my books.

Within these lost minutes. Those moons, bereaved. The hours.

Desire germinates even after our rainless decades. Yellow, again.

The color of sulfur (the devil’s realm) or the traitor’s door.

Of cowardice and warning. Of aging and decay.

How to recover what’s sifted away, the residue of our loves?

Each day more bits break off, never to be reattached.

But you, I blend with the sky, perfecting trees, the grass.

Robert Okaji is a half-Japanese poet living in Texas. He has never been awarded a literary prize, but won a goat-catching contest a few years back. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Posit, Panoply, La Presa, West Texas Literary Review, Taos Journal of International Poetry & Art, deLuge and elsewhere.